Nunavut (Repulse Bay)

Photo aérienne Nuvavut

After landing in Repulse Bay, kids wanted to be photographed with the small plane’s pilot. Curiously, it is 1 AM.

Photo aérienne Nuvavut

Here is a photograph of the pilot capturing the beautiful landscape, above Repulse Bay.

Photo aérienne Nuvavut

Upon our arrival to Iqualuit (Frobisher Bay), capital of Nunavut, we could finally see grass after hours spent flying over the northern tundra.

Photo aérienne Nuvavut

With a wind of 40 knots blowing over the airport, we were forced to secure the plane by tying it to petroleum barrels.

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Photo aérienne Nuvavut

Gracious movement of ice at low tide in Repulse Bay (66 degrees, 30 min. North/ 86 degrees, 13 min. West). The agitated tide broke the ice and offered this magnificent picture.

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Photo aérienne Nuvavut

Repulse Bay village, now called Naujaat in Inuit language ( 66 degrees 32 minutes north/86 degrees 16 minutes west). As I landed on the only small airstrip of the surroundings, it made us realise how frail and isolated this little Canadian Arctic village is.

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Photo aérienne Nuvavut

Traffic on ice in Repulse Bay. The ice is melting in July as snowmobiles and fishing boats share the seaside. Inuits have to rely on their cautiousness or they will lose their precious engines, which are essential for their own survival (Fishing and hunting).

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Photo aérienne Nuvavut

My friend, my ally, my plane; C-GMUQ on the taxiway in Repulse Bay. This same Cessna 172, with its tanks containing 7:30 hours worth of fuel, allowed me to overfly this hostile and inhospitable territory. A large fuel capacity is essential when flying for a long period of time with very few places to land.We also brought with us a survival kit, including a Winchester 45-70 rifle, in case of polar bear’s attack.

Pictures were taken at 1am under the unusual sunlight. It was the first time in my career as a photographer that i took daytime photographs in the middle of the night. This unusual but outstanding light forced me to surpass myself; I had to stabilize the camera with a shutter speed inferior to 1/500 without enhancing my ISO. My 1DS mark II and  III Canon camera and my 2.8 bright lensallowed me to create these unique pictures.